It’s Not Just Me …

I was at my daughter’s parkrun on Saturday in Yokine, Western Australia. Lovely place and a great location, albeit a tad freeeeezing on this particular day.

The FBH and I were doing our usual casual but brisk walk that turned into a bit of a light run from about half way. We eventually warmed up and enjoyed yet another parkrun which we tend to do every weekend. It’s always hard getting out of bed but it’s always well worth the effort.

As I handed in my token, a couple were sitting down after their run and one of them complained of having chest pains during the run. He also mentioned he was asthmatic  and this could have been the cause.

I normally mind my own business in these things, not out of lack of care but not having the whole story and I may be off the mark.

But this time I decided to have a chat and show him my arm wound just for impact.

“Have a guess how I got that?”, I asked. It certainly got his attention!

I was able to have a good discussion with him about my altercation with chest pains and what it led to. I certainly advised him I was no doctor and I wasn’t diagnosing his symptoms but I did suggest he get checked out. At least if there were no issues he’d have some peace of mind.

I’d hate to turn into someone who catastrophes every little niggle but in some cases where it’s life or death maybe a little bit of caution is helpful.

 

Recovery Run

img_0490Recovery runs are easy workouts that may flush out lactic acid build up, which can help prevent delayed onset of muscle soreness and speed up recovery. Something athletes do after a half marathon or marathon or during training to recover from high intensity sessions like intervals.

My runs at the moment are simply recovering from surgery.

Since The Big Day (17 July, the date of at the triple bypass) I’ve been slowly getting back to normal activity through walking and then stretching to longer walks and then more brisk walks.

At today’s parkrun at Yokine, Western Australia, I got into what I’d call normal running.

I started off walking and then decided to run a light pole, walk a light pole to see how I’d feel.

I certainly didn’t run the whole 5km today but towards the end of the run I felt that my cadence was coming back and the rhythm was feeling like something familiar.

Bypass image
Image courtesy of Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery

It’s still a bit “jumpy” where the surgeon took the two mammary arteries to use be, but certainly better then last week.

I also felt a tingling in my left thumb where the radial artery was taken from to help with the surgery.

The left arm is healing really nicely too, thanks to John Ranger, the guy who performed the suturing. He’s done an amazing piece of work.

It’s is almost nine weeks since the surgery and in terms of realising how after you’ve progressed, it’s more the things that don’t happen that make you realise its all coming together.

For example, just 3 or 4 weeks ago, my mammary arteries would cause a nerve tingling that was very aggravating. Now that’s completely gone! But you don’t realise it’s gone for a few days, if you know what I mean.

So, the progress is definitely there and just when you think something doesn’t look or feel right, it seems to go away.

I’ve never had heart surgery before (and hopefully never again) so I’m not really sure how this is supposed to go! But, so far so good!

Small Steps to Recovery

SmallSteps-811 There are three things I need to do in order to live a healthier life, and it’s not “rocket surgery!”
  1. Eat better – so my blood sugars are under control and ward off an acceleration into diabetes.
  2. Sleep better – to manage my family history of cardiovascular disease.
  3. Move better – to help with the above two points and get me back to some level of fitness and perhaps recommence ruing marathon distances.
To do this I can measure four things:
  1. Blood sugars – measure them every morning and keeping them below 6.0 where possible and below 5.5 if I can.
  2. Sleep quality – this is measure by a sleep apnea machine (ResMed Airsense 10 Elite) which shows me the number of AHIs each night (the lower the better)
  3. Movement – the number of steps take each day (target is 10,000) and the level of workout exercises I can increase on a regular basis.
  4. Weight – I am currently around 83kg but at 178cm in height I need to be 80kgs or below to a lower level of 78kg.
I have formal blood work to be completed next Monday so we’ll see what they tell us and how I am tracking with my diabetes in particular. Until then …