The Blood Sugars

poached eggsTried a little experiment yesterday.

Poached eggs on sourdough to see if the toast (being processed carbs) might affect my blood sugars.

Well, of course they will, but I’m wondering if the body can cope and have competently dealt with the sugar by the two hour mark. Being just two small slices I was wondering of this is something I can enjoy without too much of an effect.

As an HbA1c test averages out how much sugars you’ve had in your blood for the previous 3 months, this will add to that measure.

And yes, two hours later my blood sugar reading is still 8.0 mmol/L!

According to Diabetes UK, it needs to be below 7.8 mmol/L:

Screen Shot 2018-09-17 at 14.37.56

So this kinda confirms the Type 2 diabetes status, but we’re working on it being lower than that.

As per my previous post, we may be able to reverse this but not cure it. That’s fine, it simply means I need to remove ALL processed carbs from my diet ALL the time.

I can live with that! (pun not intended!)

Recovery Run

img_0490Recovery runs are easy workouts that may flush out lactic acid build up, which can help prevent delayed onset of muscle soreness and speed up recovery. Something athletes do after a half marathon or marathon or during training to recover from high intensity sessions like intervals.

My runs at the moment are simply recovering from surgery.

Since The Big Day (17 July, the date of at the triple bypass) I’ve been slowly getting back to normal activity through walking and then stretching to longer walks and then more brisk walks.

At today’s parkrun at Yokine, Western Australia, I got into what I’d call normal running.

I started off walking and then decided to run a light pole, walk a light pole to see how I’d feel.

I certainly didn’t run the whole 5km today but towards the end of the run I felt that my cadence was coming back and the rhythm was feeling like something familiar.

Bypass image
Image courtesy of Annals of Cardiothoracic Surgery

It’s still a bit “jumpy” where the surgeon took the two mammary arteries to use be, but certainly better then last week.

I also felt a tingling in my left thumb where the radial artery was taken from to help with the surgery.

The left arm is healing really nicely too, thanks to John Ranger, the guy who performed the suturing. He’s done an amazing piece of work.

It’s is almost nine weeks since the surgery and in terms of realising how after you’ve progressed, it’s more the things that don’t happen that make you realise its all coming together.

For example, just 3 or 4 weeks ago, my mammary arteries would cause a nerve tingling that was very aggravating. Now that’s completely gone! But you don’t realise it’s gone for a few days, if you know what I mean.

So, the progress is definitely there and just when you think something doesn’t look or feel right, it seems to go away.

I’ve never had heart surgery before (and hopefully never again) so I’m not really sure how this is supposed to go! But, so far so good!

The Big Saturated Fat B@stard!

 

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The demonisation of dietary fats and saturated fat: villain or hero? Episode #346

This is a podcast featuring Dr Zoe Harcombe. It’s 33 minutes long so if you are interested in this topic around health and diet, I encourage you to listen. Not only does she convey some very interesting information, Zoe is really easy to listen to and her passion about the topic comes through.

A couple of really interesting points for me:

  • the question as to whether saturated fat really is the enemy. What I am learning on this journey is that there are many factors that can affect someone’s health and it may point to things like cholesterol, sugar and saturated fat but let’s not be too quick to point the finger until we rule out other aspects that may be contributing (like a sedentary lifestyle for one obvious example)
  • the other point is similar and that with the US and UK Diet Standards were not based on evidence based research. To this end, Zoe states that these standards are based on a study involving 2500 men (no women) and that these subjects were already unwell (or, all had prior heart disease). So it’s quite amazing that the 220 million Americans and 56 million Britons at the time were being guided by 2500 unwell men!

It’s almost hilarious that the world diet is being governed by this small group! That’s a group small enough to be celebrities in this day and age.

All that said, as this blog’s approach is to do what works for me, this constant research into the history of the current diet is interesting and, perhaps, not all it is cracked up to be. It also means there are a lot of people (dieticians, nutritionists, doctors etc.) who are promoting the standard diet without fully knowing the background or consequences. Don’t get me wrong, use whatever diet works for you, but it appears not every diet suits everyone and that includes the Standard Dietary Guidelines of various countries.

Have a listen and see what you think. Comments welcome.

Cheers!

Progress Report 1

Measuring-ProgressAfter yesterday’s post on constant movement I am very conscious of what I’m doing today. I gotta practice what I preach/observe.

So this is an update on all of that less than 24 hours later.

 

 

Todays’ stats:

  • Fasting blood sugars: 6.0
  • Weight: 82.3kg (target 78kg)

The BS of 6.0 is three days in a row so a big tick for consistency but I’d really like to see some 5.x in there.

Why 6.0?

My diet yesterday was a bit higher in sugar being Father’s Day. A roast pork was good but the rolled roast turkey, while delicious, had some stuffing that may have contributed to the reading. Along with 2 glasses of red wine and one of champagne. Oh, and the amazing brownie/mousse made by my son-in-law.

I did end the night with 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar (ACV). The benefits of which can be seen here by Dr Eric Berg.

Overall, the 6.0 this morning is self inflicted and easy to address.

Weight?

Pretty steady. It hovers around that figure so that is working for now, as long as I keep up this constant movement idea. Obviously I’d like to see it go down.

I do see a lot of posts ands research about addressing diabetes. One of which is losing weight. That doesn’t really apply to me (thankfully) so it’s just a lazy 4kg to lose but that last few can be hard.

Today

I’m now trying to follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG). Whereas previously I was experimenting with Low Carb.

Breakfast

  • Steel cut oats (half a cup, cooked)
  • 1/3 cup no fat milk
  • 2 scrambled eggs
  • 2 x espresso coffees with pouring cream (the cream has to go!) 😦

2 hour blood glucose reading: 8.7 – not good!

Morning Snack

  • Granny smith apple – big tick
  • Long macchiato with full cream milk – maybe not a big tick

Movement day has been 4,380 steps of which around 3,000 was walking the dog.

While I can check my blood sugars throughout the day the key factor is the morning, fasting BG level so I’ll report on that mostly.

Lunch

  • 2 tbsp of ACV
  • 400ml sparkling water
  • 1 x slices of Helga’s low carb soy and toasted sesame bread
  • 80g roast chicken, no skin
  • 4 x brussel sprouts
  • 1 cup spinach and rocket
  • 1/2 carrot, raw

The chicken was leftover from Saturday and had to be eaten. I struggled to pit the skin in the bin and not eat it. It is so delicious. Anyway, trying to follow the guidelines.

Afternoon snack

  • 30g nuts – likely walnuts

These will satiate and provide the right nutrients until dinner.

Dinner

  • 2 tbsp ACV
  • Chicken dish of some sort – haven’t decided yet.
  • Lots of vegetables